Easter Egg? ESO Recipe: Twenty-Four-Raven Pie

While updating my Master Provisioning Cookbook, this recipe seemed oddly familiar.

The gamerdad in me then suddenly realized why.

Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye.
Four and twenty blackbirds,
Baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened
The birds began to sing;
Wasn’t that a dainty dish,
To set before the king.
The king was in his counting house,
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird
And pecked off her nose.

Sing a Song of Sixpence

I see what you did there Zenimax Online Services.

Fun Fact

Many interpretations have been placed on this rhyme. It is known that a 16th-century amusement was to place live birds in a pie, as a form of entremet. An Italian cookbook from 1549 (translated into English in 1598) contained such a recipe:[3] “to make pies so that birds may be alive in them and fly out when it is cut up” and this was referred to in a cook book of 1725 by John Nott.[1][4] The wedding of Marie de’ Medici and Henry IV of France in 1600 contains some interesting parallels. “The first surprise, though, came shortly before the starter—when the guests sat down, unfolded their napkins and saw songbirds fly out. The highlight of the meal was sherbets of milk and honey, which were created by Buontalenti.”[5]

Wikipedia